RSS | Archive | Random

About

This blog features vegetarian sauropods and other things that amuse me.

Expect to see posts about: dinosaurs, evolution, science, LGBTQ issues, geek stuff, politics, spirituality, faith, justice, food, Baltimore, and my family.

Writing here reflects my own interests only, and not the opinions of organizations or employers with whom I am affiliated.

My Stuff
Sermons
Our Babies
Flickr
About Me
Ask a Question


Dinosaur and Science Links
Archosaur Musings
Dinochick
Dinosaur Tracking (Smithsonian)
Love in the Time of Chasmosaurs
MD Science Center
Palaeoblog
Pterosaur.net
Sauropod Vertebra Picture OTW
Science Daily (Dino Feed)
Science News
The Whirlpool of Life

Following

19 September 14
mindblowingscience:

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Had a Huge Shnoz

A newly discovered dinosaur once boasted a very impressive shnoz, but scientists are still trying to figure out the purpose of this distinctive nasal profile, according to a new study.
Named Rhinorex condrupus, meaning “King Nose,” this hadrosaur lived during the Late Cretaceous period some 75 million years ago in what is now present-day Utah. This herbivore is closely related to other known hadrosaurs like Parasaurolophus and Edmontosaurus, species that are known for their bony crests extending down from the skull. But Rhinorex, dscribed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, is unique in that instead of the typical bony crest, it shows off a rather huge nose.
Rhinorex was first unearthed in the 1990s from Utah’s Neslen formation, later to be studied for its well-preserved skin impressions and then stored at Brigham Young University (BYU). When researchers Terry Gates, a joint postdoctoral researcher with North Carolina State, and colleague Rodney Sheetz from BYU, brought the fossil out of hiding to reconstruct its skull, they realized they had in their hands a new species.
"We had almost the entire skull, which was wonderful," Gates said in a statement, “but the preparation was very difficult. It took two years to dig the fossil out of the sandstone it was embedded in - it was like digging a dinosaur skull out of a concrete driveway.”
Based on the remains, the researchers estimate that Rhinorex was about 30 feet long and weighed over 8,500 pounds. This plant-eater, living in a swampy estuarial environment located some 50 miles from the coast, is not only fascinating but it also helping paleontologists fill in the gaps about the hadrosaur family tree.
"We’ve found other hadrosaurs from the same time period but located about 200 miles farther south that are adapted to a different environment," Gates said. "This discovery gives us a geographic snapshot of the Cretaceous, and helps us place contemporary species in their correct time and place."
While Rhinorex is helping to solve the mystery of hadrosaurs, it has yet to reveal the mystery behind its large shnoz. Despite the obvious assumption that such a large nose would mean Rhinorex had a super sense of smell, researchers say that it, like other dinosaurs during that time, probably wasn’t a great smeller. Instead, the nose could have been used to attract mates, recognize other members of its species, or as a beak to smash plants.

mindblowingscience:

Newly Discovered Dinosaur Had a Huge Shnoz

A newly discovered dinosaur once boasted a very impressive shnoz, but scientists are still trying to figure out the purpose of this distinctive nasal profile, according to a new study.

Named Rhinorex condrupus, meaning “King Nose,” this hadrosaur lived during the Late Cretaceous period some 75 million years ago in what is now present-day Utah. This herbivore is closely related to other known hadrosaurs like Parasaurolophus and Edmontosaurus, species that are known for their bony crests extending down from the skull. But Rhinorex, dscribed in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, is unique in that instead of the typical bony crest, it shows off a rather huge nose.

Rhinorex was first unearthed in the 1990s from Utah’s Neslen formation, later to be studied for its well-preserved skin impressions and then stored at Brigham Young University (BYU). When researchers Terry Gates, a joint postdoctoral researcher with North Carolina State, and colleague Rodney Sheetz from BYU, brought the fossil out of hiding to reconstruct its skull, they realized they had in their hands a new species.

"We had almost the entire skull, which was wonderful," Gates said in a statement, “but the preparation was very difficult. It took two years to dig the fossil out of the sandstone it was embedded in - it was like digging a dinosaur skull out of a concrete driveway.”

Based on the remains, the researchers estimate that Rhinorex was about 30 feet long and weighed over 8,500 pounds. This plant-eater, living in a swampy estuarial environment located some 50 miles from the coast, is not only fascinating but it also helping paleontologists fill in the gaps about the hadrosaur family tree.

"We’ve found other hadrosaurs from the same time period but located about 200 miles farther south that are adapted to a different environment," Gates said. "This discovery gives us a geographic snapshot of the Cretaceous, and helps us place contemporary species in their correct time and place."

While Rhinorex is helping to solve the mystery of hadrosaurs, it has yet to reveal the mystery behind its large shnoz. Despite the obvious assumption that such a large nose would mean Rhinorex had a super sense of smell, researchers say that it, like other dinosaurs during that time, probably wasn’t a great smeller. Instead, the nose could have been used to attract mates, recognize other members of its species, or as a beak to smash plants.

Reblogged: thedramatictyrannosaur

Posted: 1:43 PM
 Source 
Tried some cross training this morning using instructions from the coach of the 10k group that just started. I used the modified version with my legs on the ground.

 Source

Tried some cross training this morning using instructions from the coach of the 10k group that just started. I used the modified version with my legs on the ground.

17 September 14

For instance

Posted: 10:07 AM

Mystery and Adventure

I’m finding all kinds of treasures around the house as I look for the books I need for this week’s writing. One of the joys of being in a multireligious household is that the books never belong in just one section. Is it in history, meditation, sacred text, or one of the piles of books from recent projects? Yes, we could theoretically catalogue all of our books and shelve them by call number, but discoverability is, so far, the more amusing method.

Posted: 7:55 AM

Costume Update

Formerly-vampire Wembley has decided he wants to be a Nac Mac Feegle. I’ll be needing plaid fabric, temporary red hair color, and blue body paint. He also wants a vampire cape for when he turns our house into a haunted castle (apparently?). Maybe I’ll make a reversible black and plaid cloak.

We ordered the discount version of the store bought costume for Mokey. She would still like to do the project with the long tutu and the iron-on gems.

Both/and. They must be my kids.

Posted: 5:52 AM
ackb:

orioles:

Your Baltimore Orioles are the 2014 American League East Champions! #WeWontStop

Woooo Hooooo!

ackb:

orioles:

Your Baltimore Orioles are the 2014 American League East Champions! #WeWontStop

Woooo Hooooo!

Reblogged: ackb

Posted: 5:47 AM
crownedrose:

Dreadnoughtus Day: Saturday September 20th.
Everyone’s been asking if we will have Dreadnoughtus on display for the public, and luckily it is coming true this Saturday! If you’re in the Philadelphia area, come visit The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University for a day full of titanosaur epicness. Here is the day’s breakdown:

Auditorium
The Discovery of Dreadnoughtus11 a.m.
Join Drexel University paleontologist Ken Lacovara for a tremendous talk on his discovery ofDreadnoughtus.
Life in the Field2:30 p.m.  
Meet Jason Poole, the Academy’s own dinosaur hall coordinator, artist, and fossil preparator. Poole was part of the team in Argentina that discovered Dreadnoughtus. He leads the team in the Fossil Prep Lab—the experts who prepared fossils of Dreadnoughtus right here at the museum.
At Science Live Ongoing, all day
Actual fossil specimens from Dreadnoughtus, a massive plant-eater will be on display at the museum for one day only at Science Live! Talk to team members who were on the dig in Argentina, as well as the experts who helped prepare the fossil in the Academy of Natural Sciences’ Fossil Prep Lab.
North American Hall
Learn more about sauropods, titanosaurs, and how paleontologists find fossils at a discovery station in North American Hall. Touch specimens, do experiments, and see how long Dreadnoughtus really was! Hint: way longer than the Academy’s T. rex!
Dinosaur Hall
Measuring up to 42 feet in length and weighing in at an estimated 7.5 tons, Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest predators to ever walk the Earth. This impressive animal is one of many dinosaurs and other Mesozoic creatures you’ll encounter in Dinosaur Hall. More than 30 species are represented, about half of which are full skeletal mounts, including Avaceratops, Chasmosaurus, Corythosaurus, Deinonychus, Pachycephalosaurus, Tenontosaurus, and Tylosaurus.
Fossil Prep Lab
If you want to see paleontology in action, check out the Academy’s Fossil Prep Lab. You can watch as our staff, volunteers, and other skilled workers prepare fossils for study by scientists from other research institutions.

It’s going to be an awesome day!

Dagnabbit! I can’t go, but maybe one of my Philadelphia followers can. Enjoy!

crownedrose:

Dreadnoughtus Day: Saturday September 20th.

Everyone’s been asking if we will have Dreadnoughtus on display for the public, and luckily it is coming true this Saturday! If you’re in the Philadelphia area, come visit The Academy of Natural Sciences of Drexel University for a day full of titanosaur epicness. Here is the day’s breakdown:

Auditorium

The Discovery of Dreadnoughtus
11 a.m.

Join Drexel University paleontologist Ken Lacovara for a tremendous talk on his discovery ofDreadnoughtus.

Life in the Field
2:30 p.m.  

Meet Jason Poole, the Academy’s own dinosaur hall coordinator, artist, and fossil preparator. Poole was part of the team in Argentina that discovered Dreadnoughtus. He leads the team in the Fossil Prep Lab—the experts who prepared fossils of Dreadnoughtus right here at the museum.

At Science Live 
Ongoing, all day

Actual fossil specimens from Dreadnoughtus, a massive plant-eater will be on display at the museum for one day only at Science Live! Talk to team members who were on the dig in Argentina, as well as the experts who helped prepare the fossil in the Academy of Natural Sciences’ Fossil Prep Lab.

North American Hall

Learn more about sauropods, titanosaurs, and how paleontologists find fossils at a discovery station in North American Hall. Touch specimens, do experiments, and see how long Dreadnoughtus really was! Hint: way longer than the Academy’s T. rex!

Dinosaur Hall

Measuring up to 42 feet in length and weighing in at an estimated 7.5 tons, Tyrannosaurus rex was one of the largest predators to ever walk the Earth. This impressive animal is one of many dinosaurs and other Mesozoic creatures you’ll encounter in Dinosaur Hall. More than 30 species are represented, about half of which are full skeletal mounts, including Avaceratops, Chasmosaurus, Corythosaurus, Deinonychus, Pachycephalosaurus, Tenontosaurus, and Tylosaurus.

Fossil Prep Lab

If you want to see paleontology in action, check out the Academy’s Fossil Prep Lab. You can watch as our staff, volunteers, and other skilled workers prepare fossils for study by scientists from other research institutions.

It’s going to be an awesome day!

Dagnabbit! I can’t go, but maybe one of my Philadelphia followers can. Enjoy!

Reblogged: crownedrose

16 September 14
sesamestreet:

Nooooooooooony noony noony noony noon noon noon! *Squeak*

Coincidental with my last post.

sesamestreet:

Nooooooooooony noony noony noony noon noon noon! *Squeak*

Coincidental with my last post.

Reblogged: sesamestreet

Posted: 2:34 PM

Champion Procrastinating

Seriously considered re-reading a 500-page book as research for this week’s writing. This is how much I don’t want to write my outline.

I am reminded that writing hasn’t gotten easier, but I have gotten practice in recognizing my patterns. Resistance is part of the process. Words will happen. This will be OK.

Posted: 1:48 PM
ackb:

workingamerica:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka spoke in Missouri today about the unfolding events in #Ferguson.
Full speech here—it’s a must read: http://bit.ly/1qX7cKq http://ift.tt/1y7Qizg

The test of our movement’s commitment to our legacy is not whether we post Dr. King’s picture in our union halls, it is do we take up his fight when the going gets tough, when the fight gets real against the evils that still exist today.
When a new immigrant gets mistreated by management because they don’t speak the language, that is our fight. 
When an African American worker doesn’t get a promotion or fair pay because of the color of his or her skin, that is our fight. When women are paid less than men for the same work, that is a fight for every single one of us. 
We cannot afford to have “my issues” and “your issue,” we must ALL stand together and mobilize around our issues.
You see, we have a choice: We can either live our history or we can change it.

ackb:

workingamerica:

AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka spoke in Missouri today about the unfolding events in #Ferguson.

Full speech here—it’s a must read: http://bit.ly/1qX7cKq http://ift.tt/1y7Qizg

The test of our movement’s commitment to our legacy is not whether we post Dr. King’s picture in our union halls, it is do we take up his fight when the going gets tough, when the fight gets real against the evils that still exist today.

When a new immigrant gets mistreated by management because they don’t speak the language, that is our fight. 

When an African American worker doesn’t get a promotion or fair pay because of the color of his or her skin, that is our fight. When women are paid less than men for the same work, that is a fight for every single one of us. 

We cannot afford to have “my issues” and “your issue,” we must ALL stand together and mobilize around our issues.

You see, we have a choice: We can either live our history or we can change it.

Reblogged: kelsium

Themed by Hunson. Originally by Josh